Vintage Editorials: 7 Of The Best Jean Muir Bill Gibb…

Vintage Editorials: 7 Of The Best Jean Muir Bill Gibb…

Vintage Editorials: 7 Of The Best Jean Muir Bill Gibb...
Seven of the best/Jean Muir. Photographs by James Wedge. Scanned by Miss Booty Barefoot. Discovered in Harpers & Queen 1974.
Vintage Editorials: 7 Of The Best Jean Muir Bill Gibb...
Seven of the best/Jean Muir. Photographs by James Wedge. Scanned by Miss Booty Barefoot. Discovered in Harpers & Queen 1974.
Vintage Editorials: 7 Of The Best Jean Muir Bill Gibb...
Seven of the best/Bill Gibb. Drawings By Richard Ely. Scanned by Miss Booty Barefoot. Discovered in Harpers & Queen Feb 1974.
Vintage Editorials: 7 Of The Best Jean Muir Bill Gibb...
Seven of the best/Bill Gibb. Drawings By Richard Ely. Scanned by Miss Booty Barefoot. Discovered in Harpers & Queen Feb 1974.
Vintage Editorials: 7 Of The Best Jean Muir Bill Gibb...
Seven of the best/Bill Gibb. Drawings By Richard Ely. Scanned by Miss Booty Barefoot. Discovered in Harpers & Queen Feb 1974.

This month I seem to have two main Vintage obsessions. Bill Gibb & Jean Muir! I have no idea why just these two ‘particular’ iconic designers, but I just CANNOT seem to get enough of them. I have read articles, researched books, looked through sketches, read, read, read until my eyes blurred and my poor little right wrist started to feel numb from the lack of blood flow from mouse usage overload. These two mini editorials are exquisite. The photographs are well taken and give a true feel of movement and flare, whilst the sketches are subtle yet striking, detailed and incredibly elegant. The clothes simply jump off the page – well, they certainly made me want to buy, wear own them. Here’s a little bit of information about the late great Muir & Gibb….. Jean Muir Trained within the industry, Jean Muir worked as sketcher, then at Jaeger and finally for Jane and Jane until she established her own label in 1966 which finally outlived her.  Having gained a reputation for simple, classic clothing defined by exquisite cut and detail, it is, perhaps, hardly surprising to learn that Jean Muir started honing her eye for design as a sketcher for Liberty of London in the Fifties.While the Sixties youth-quake dominated British fashion, Muir’s pared-down styles in luxury fabrics in dark or muted tones appealed to sophisticated women looking to define a new, classically sexy look all of their own. Muir’s own style — severe black bob and pale skin, offset by a slash of red lipstick — hinted at the intelligent, elegant customer to whom her timeless clothing appealed. (perhaps this is why her style appeals to me?) Known for her precision cut and great attention to detail, Jean Muir clothes “stand alone.” They are usually unadorned. She did not officially invent the little black dress, but she brought it to a new level, with signature colours like navy blue and black. Jean Muir perpetuated the all round use of the little black dress.  The team Miss Muir assembled continue to design and make clothes to the same standards that she laid down and achieved in her lifetime, it is impossible to avoid the word, ‘Timeless’, to describe the designs created by ‘Jean Muir’ in the 21st Century, the quality of materials and design, combined with the skills of the dressmakers involved in the manufacture of the clothes are a sign that the Jean Muir Label will be available for any woman wishing to have the best for her wardrobe. (text by RDW Norton) Bill Gibb

When he died in 1988 the fashion industry lost one of its most adventurous and exciting designers. Bill Gibb was a genuine original; a man who was not afraid to go his own way. Although he was caught up in the world of his contemporaries, The 1970s was undoubtedly Bill Gibb’s decade. It began dramatically when he was awarded “Designer of the Year” by “Vogue” magazine, and for the next ten years he continued to surprise and delight as each new collection took up a new theme. Thirty years on it seems a fitting time to review his contribution to fashion.Bill’s designs were always the unexpected, a style which changed from collection to collection, always fresh and strong. One of his greatest achievements was to blend fabrics and colour in a flamboyant and dramatic way, mixing pattern on pattern, check on floral, texture on texture, revolutionising the way designers treated cloth. His evening wear was an extravagant theatrical profusion of luxurious and sensuous fabrics, a fantasy of sparkle and shimmer. All his clothes were designed to make women look and feel good. Elizabeth Taylor wore one of his designs back to front in order to show off better her cleavage! Twiggy dressed in his gorgeous designs while other stars like Bianca Jagger had wardrobes bursting with his clothes. The devoted clients who still have their “Bill Gibbs” enthuse at length on their infinite wearability and timeless quality. Bill Gibb made it possible to break free from the mould of wearing the correct colour, the correct hemline, the correct cut; he simply made clothes that flattered and could be worn again and again. (text by  Christine Rew)

ABOUT MISS BOOTY BAREFOOT

Natasha (a.k.a Miss Booty Barefoot) is a Cambridge-based Vintage Boutique owner, style maven and all out fashion lover. She is also an active vintage fashion blogger, street style photographer and vintage magazine curator. Being a busy mother of 2 small children, devoted wife & Boutique owner certainly takes up most of her time – however there are 24 hrs in a day, and 7 day’s in a week, so she try’s to squeeze as much out of her life as she possibly can.

You can find her at Facebook @barefootvintage.co.uk and Instagram @missbootybarefoot.

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