Category Archives: Flix

Vintage Flix: The Breakfast Club (1985)

Vintage Flix: The Breakfast Club (1985)

Vintage Flix: The Breakfast Club (1985)

“Screws fall out all the time, the world’s an imperfect place.” – John Bender

Ah the beauty of youth, a period in time where for the first and probably the last time we feel we have enough energy to turn the earth on its axis; yet there’s always a downside to this raw and unbridled desire – parents and authority figures.

Vintage Flix: The Breakfast Club (1985) Vintage Film Reviews by Neil. Vintage Films explored in all their glory!
Who wants sushi for lunch?

 

Aged sixteen, The Breakfast Club was an experience I remember having over a friend’s house on a rented VHS tape. With the same number of us watching six American teenagers survive a whole Saturday of detention, the ending left me feeling that no system anywhere could label me and put me in a box. That message has more authentic power than perhaps I realized back then, because as I grew into the person I am today, I always rallied against conformity, not for the sake of indifference I might add, but more from a position of freedom of thought, speech and actions.

Vintage Flix: The Breakfast Club (1985) Vintage Film Reviews by Neil. Vintage Films explored in all their glory!
And this is what elephantiasis of the nuts looks like…

 

Vintage Flix: The Breakfast Club (1985) Vintage Film Reviews by Neil. Vintage Films explored in all their glory!
This is no time for hanging round bars…

 

Fast-forward (excuse the pun) 30 years and that message is as if not more important than ever before. We live in a technological society, an age of data collection and a need to quantify and qualify everyone. I am quietly confident the reasons for this will one day become clear, but whatever the long-term aims might require, our individuality and joy of discovering our differences must be preserved and celebrated. The Breakfast Club reminds us all that the risk taken to speak to another person pays greater dividends than a collective and isolated silence.

Vintage Flix: The Breakfast Club (1985) Vintage Film Reviews by Neil. Vintage Films explored in all their glory!
My future is so bright I’ve gotta wear shades…

 

This blog needs no character observation or analysis of cinematic approach; instead, the message being delivered is one of imploring the reader. If ever there was a need to sit down and look back at your youth, then The Breakfast Club is the perfect place to start. With so much emotion, honesty, vulnerability and pain contained within one room (ironically the school library), it demonstrates the miracle that any teenagers get through their adolescence unscarred, never mind with academic grades to be proud of.

Vintage Flix: The Breakfast Club (1985) Vintage Film Reviews by Neil. Vintage Films explored in all their glory!
Excuse me Sir, but that’s eight.

 

I love this film for so many reasons and there isn’t a single player in this intimate theatre that doesn’t affect me emotionally every time I watch it and it demonstrates that John Hughes was the epitome of lightening-in-a-bottle thinking. In fact, it is probably reasonable to say that there will not be another writer/director that captured so acutely, the minds and hearts of us all at that delicate age.

Vintage Flix: The Breakfast Club (1985) Vintage Film Reviews by Neil. Vintage Films explored in all their glory!
If I could just get her to look at me.

 

Vintage Flix: The Breakfast Club (1985) Vintage Film Reviews by Neil. Vintage Films explored in all their glory!
Storming, norming and forming…

 

Such lamenting leaves me only to summarise that The Breakfast Club is still the reference film for youth both then and now, and will prove just as relevant for generations to come; because you can change the clothes, the sets and the slang, but the emotion and humanness within will always remain unfettered.

 

Vintage Flix: The Breakfast Club (1985) Vintage Film Reviews by Neil. Vintage Films explored in all their glory!
Will you still love me tomorrow?

 

Directed by John Hughes. Featured song: Don’t you forget about me. Costume design: Marilyn Vance. Power-hungry principal (Paul Gleason). The disparate group includes rebel John (Judd Nelson), princess Claire (Molly Ringwald), outcast Allison (Ally Sheedy), brainy Brian (Anthony Michael Hall) and Andrew (Emilio Estevez), the jock. Editorial written by Neil Sean Egan-Ronayne for Barefoot Vintage ‘Vintage Flix. Vintage Flix: The Breakfast Club (1985). Produced by Natasha for www.barefoot-vintage.co.uk.

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A LITTLE BIT ABOUT …..NEIL

Neil is a forty-something father of two (incredible daughters) and husband to the hardest working and stunningly beautiful wife in the world. His passions (besides family) are most certainly law, academia, writing, cooking world cuisine, cinema (home cinema at least) and staying healthy. If you need to find him then by all means comment on the barefoot vintage website and he hopes you enjoy reading his occasional blogs…


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